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Top Ten Things You Need to Know About Making Federal Tax Payments

Will you be making a payment with your federal tax return this year?

If so, here are 10 important things the IRS wants you to know about making tax payments correctly.

  1. Never send cash!
  2. If you file electronically, you can file and pay in a single step by authorizing an electronic funds withdrawal via tax preparation software or a tax professional.
  3. Whether you file a paper return or electronically, you can pay by phone or online using a credit or debit card.
  4. Electronic payment options provide an alternative to paying taxes or user fees by check or money order. You can make payments 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Visit IRS.gov and search e-pay, or refer to Publication 3611, e-File Electronic Payments for more details.
  5. If you itemize, you may be able to deduct the convenience fee charged for paying individual income taxes with a credit or debit card as a miscellaneous itemized deduction on Form 1040, Schedule A, Itemized Deductions. The deduction is subject to the 2 percent limit.
  6. Enclose your payment with your return but do not staple it to the form.
  7. If you pay by check or money order, make sure it is payable to the “United States Treasury.”
  8. Always provide your correct name, address, Social Security number listed first on the tax form, daytime telephone number, tax year and form number on the front of your check or money order.
  9. Complete and include Form 1040-V, Payment Voucher, when sending your payment to the IRS. This will help the IRS process your payment accurately and efficiently.
  10. For more information, call 800-829-4477 for TeleTax Topic 158, Ensuring Proper Credit of Payments. You can also find out more in Publication 17, Your Federal Income Tax and Form 1040-V, both available at IRS.gov.

 

Top Ten Things You Need to Know About Making Federal Tax Payments

no-refund

Three Ways to Pay Your Federal Income Tax

People who owe taxes but can’t pay the full amount owed by the April deadline should still file their return on time and pay as much as they can to avoid penalties and interest. If you can’t pay the full amount, you should contact the IRS to ask about alternative payment options.  Here are some of the alternative payment options you may want to consider:

 

Three Ways to Pay Your Federal Income Tax

  1. Additional Time to Pay Based on your circumstances, you may be granted a short additional time to pay your tax in full. A brief additional amount of time to pay can be requested through the Online Payment Agreement application at IRS.gov or by calling 800-829-1040. Taxpayers who request and are granted an additional 30 to 120 days to pay the tax in full generally will pay less in penalties and interest than if the debt were repaid through an installment agreement over a greater period of time.
  2. Installment Agreement You can apply for an IRS installment agreement using the Web-based Online Payment Agreement application on IRS.gov. This Web-based application allows taxpayers who owe $25,000 or less in combined tax, penalties and interestto self-qualify, apply for, and receive immediate notification of approval. You can also request an installment agreement before your current tax liabilities are actually assessed by using OPA. The OPA option provides you with a simple and convenient way to establish an installment agreement and eliminates the need for personal interaction with IRS and reduces paper processing. You may also complete and submit a Form 9465, make your request in writing, or call 1-800-829-1040 to make your request. For balances over $25,000, you are required to complete a financial statement to determine the monthly payment amount for an installment plan. For more complete information see Tax Topic 202, Tax Payment Options on IRS.gov.
  3. Pay by Credit Card or Debit Card You can charge your taxes on your American Express, MasterCard, Visa or Discover credit cards. Additionally, you can pay by using your debit card. However, the debit card must be a Visa Consumer Debit Card, or a NYCE, Pulse or Star Debit Card. To pay by credit card or debit card, contact one of the service providers at its telephone number or Web site listed below and follow the instructions. There is no IRS fee for credit or debit card payments, but the processing companies charge a convenience fee or flat fee. If you are paying by credit card, the service providers charge a convenience fee based on the amount you are paying. If you are paying by debit card, the service providers charge a flat fee of $3.89 to $3.95.Do not add the convenience fee or flat fee to your tax payment.

 

Tax Credit Card Processing Companies

The processing companies are:

Official Payments Corporation:
To pay by debit or credit card: 888-UPAY-TAX (888-872-9829),
www.officialpayments.com/fed

Link2Gov Corporation:
To pay by debit or credit card: 888-PAY-1040 (888-729-1040),
www.pay1040.com

RBS WorldPay, Inc.
To pay by debit or credit card: 888-9PAY-TAX (888-972-9829),
www.payUSAtax.com

For more information about filing and paying your taxes, visit IRS.gov and choose 1040 Central or refer to the Form 1040 Instructions or IRS Publication 17, Your Federal Income Tax. You can download forms and publications at IRS.gov or request a free copy by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).

2007 Federal Tax Rate Schedules

 2007 Federal Tax Rate Schedules

Note: These tax rate schedules are provided so that you can compute your federal estimated income tax for 2007. To compute your actual income tax, please see the instructions for 2007 Form 1040, 1040A, or 1040EZ as appropriate when they are available.

Schedule X — Single

If taxable income is  over–But not over–The tax is:

$0 $7,825 10% of the amount over $0
$7,825 $31,850 $782.50 plus 15% of the amount over 7,825
$31,850 $77,100 $4,386.25 plus 25% of the amount over 31,850
$77,100 $160,850 $15,698.75 plus 28% of the amount over 77,100
$160,850 $349,700 $39,148.75 plus 33% of the amount over 160,850
$349,700 no limit $101,469.25 plus 35% of the amount over 349,700

Schedule Y-1 — Married Filing Jointly or Qualifying Widow(er)

If taxable income is over–But not over–The tax is:

$0 $15,650 10% of the amount over $0
$15,650 $63,700 $1,565.00 plus 15% of the amount over 15,650
$63,700 $128,500 $8,772.50 plus 25% of the amount over 63,700
$128,500 $195,850 $24,972.50 plus 28% of the amount over 128,500
$195,850 $349,700 $43,830.50 plus 33% of the amount over 195,850
$349,700 no limit $94,601.00 plus 35% of the amount over 349,700

Schedule Y-2 — Married Filing Separately

If taxable income is over–But not over–The tax is:

$0 $7,825 10% of the amount over $0
$7,825 $31,850 $782.50 plus 15% of the amount over 7,825
$31,850 $64,250 $4,386.25 plus 25% of the amount over 31,850
$64,250 $97,925 $12,486.25 plus 28% of the amount over 64,250
$97,925 $174,850 $21,915.25 plus 33% of the amount over 97,925
$174,850 no limit $47,300.50 plus 35% of the amount over 174,850

Schedule Z — Head of Household

If taxable income is over–But not over–The tax is:

$0 $11,200 10% of the amount over $0
$11,200 $42,650 $1,120.00 plus 15% of the amount over 11,200
$42,650 $110,100 $5,837.50 plus 25% of the amount over 42,650
$110,100 $178,350 $22,700.00 plus 28% of the amount over 110,100
$178,350 $349,700 $41,810.00 plus 33% of the amount over 178,350
$349,700 no limit $98,355.50 plus 35% of the amount over 349,700

Federal Income Tax Forms

Most Popular IRS Forms & IRS Publications

These IRS forms and publications will help taxpayers file taxes and determine their tax liability in a wide range of situation.

Form 1040, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return (PDF)
Annual income tax return filed by citizens or residents of the United States
Related: Instructions for Form 1040 (PDF)  Tax Tables (PDF)

Additional forms and schedules for filing Form 1040  

Form 1040A, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return (PDF)
Shorter version of Form 1040 allows you to report limited types of income and to claim certain adjustments. You cannot itemize deductions if you file Form 1040-A
Related: Instructions for Form 1040A (PDF)

Form 1040-ES, Estimated Tax for Individuals (PDF)
Figure and pay your estimated tax on income that is not subject to withholding (for example, earnings from self-employment, interest, dividends, rents, alimony, etc.)
Related: Instructions for Form 1040-ES (PDF)

Form 1040EZ, Income Tax Return for Single and Joint Filers With No Dependents (PDF)
Simplest individual income tax return form to fill out. If you file Form 1040EZ, you cannot itemize deductions or claim any adjustments to income or tax credits (other than the earned income credit).
Related: Instructions for 1040EZ (PDF)

Need help choosing the right 1040 for your situation? Use the Interactive Tax Assistant (ITA)or read Which Form – 1040, 1040-A, or 1040-EZ?

Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate (PDF)
Complete Form W-4 so that your employer can withhold the correct federal income tax from your pay. Consider completing a new Form W-4 each year and when your personal or financial situation changes.
Related: Withholding Calculator

Form W-9, Request for Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) and Certification (PDF)
Provide your correct SSN or other TIN to the person who is required to file an information return with the IRS to report, for example, income paid to you, real estate transactions, mortgage interest you paid, acquisition or abandonment of secured property, cancellation of debt, or contributions you made to an IRA.
Related: Instructions for the Requestor of Form W-9 (PDF)

Publication 15 (Circular E), Employer’s Tax Guide (PDF)
Explains your tax responsibilities as an employer. It also includes tax tables that you need to figure the taxes to withhold from each employee.
Related: Read Pub 15 Online

Publication 17, Your Federal Income Tax (PDF)
Explains the general rules for filing a federal income tax return. It supplements the information contained in your tax form instruction booklet. It explains the tax law to make sure you pay only the tax you owe and no more.
Related: Read Pub 17 Online

Look for other current forms, instructions, and publications

The Internal Revenue Service offers content in a variety of file formats to accommodate people who use assistive technology such as screen reading software, refreshable Braille displays, and voice recognition software. We have prepared hundreds of tax forms and publications that can be downloaded or viewed online in text-only, Braille ready files, browser-friendly HTML, accessible PDF, and large print.

To download these files, use the following links:

Helpful Links

Check out the English/ASL video on the IRS YouTube Channel and meet Lex, the Tax Time canine. Lex introduces the terrific online services available for people with disabilities. Select the video link and then select the Leave IRS Site link to start the video.