eitc

Top 9 Tips For Earned Income Credit Eligibility

The Earned Income Tax Credit is a financial boost for workers earning $49,078 or less in 2011. Four of five eligible taxpayers filed for and received their EITC last year. The IRS wants you to get what you earned also, if you are eligible.

 

Here are the top 9 things the IRS wants you to know about this valuable credit, which has been making the lives of working people a little easier since 1975.

1.  As your financial, marital or parental situations change from year to year, you should review the EITC eligibility rules to determine whether you qualify. Just because you didn’t qualify last year doesn’t mean you won’t this year.

2.  If you qualify, the credit could be worth up to $5,751. EITC not only reduces the federal tax you owe, but could result in a refund. The amount of your EITC is based on your earned income and whether or not there are qualifying children in your household. The average credit was around $2,240 last year.

3.  If you are eligible for EITC, you must file a federal income tax return and specifically claim the credit – even if you are not otherwise required to file. Remember to include Schedule EIC, Earned Income Credit when you file your Form 1040 or, if you file Form 1040A, use and retain the EIC worksheet.

4.  You do not qualify for EITC if your filing status is Married Filing Separately.

5.  You must have a valid Social Security number for yourself, your spouse – if filing a joint return – and any qualifying child listed on Schedule EIC.

6.  You must have earned income. You have earned income if you work for someone who pays you wages, you are self-employed, you have income from farming, or – in some cases – you receive disability income.

7.  Married couples and single people without children may qualify. If you do not have qualifying children, you must also meet the age and residency requirements, as well as dependency rules.

8.  Special rules apply to members of the U.S. Armed Forces in combat zones. Members of the military can elect to include their nontaxable combat pay in earned income for the EITC. If you make this election, the combat pay remains nontaxable.

9.  Free help is available at Volunteer Income Tax Assistance sites to help you prepare and claim your EITC. If you are preparing your taxes electronically, the software will figure the credit for you. To find a VITA site near you, visit the IRS.gov website.

 

Top 9 Tips For Earned Income Credit Eligibility

For more information about the EITC, see IRS Publication 596, Earned Income Credit. The 2011 EIC Chart has all your earned income credit amounts based on total income. You can download this publication and chart from this website or order it by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676). The IRS.gov site has a Spanish version if needed.

 

Earned Income Tax Credit IRS Information

Publication 596, Earned Income Credit (EIC)
Tax Topic 601, Earned Income Credit
2011 EIC Chart

kids

10 Tax Benefits for Parents with Kids

Your children may help you qualify for some valuable tax benefits.

Here are 10 things parents should consider when filing their taxes this year.

1. Dependents In most cases, a child can be claimed as a dependent in the year they were born. For more information see IRS Publication 501, Exemptions, Standard Deduction, and Filing Information.

2. Child Tax Credit You may be able to take this credit for each of your children under age 17. If you do not benefit from the full amount of the Child Tax Credit, you may be eligible for the Additional Child Tax Credit. For more information see IRS Publication 972, Child Tax Credit.

3. Child and Dependent Care Credit You may be able to claim this credit if you pay someone to care for your child or children under age 13 so that you can work or look for work. See IRS Publication 503, Child and Dependent Care Expenses.

 

10 Tax Benefits for Parents with Kids

4. Earned Income Tax Credit The EITC is a tax benefit for certain people who work and have earned income from wages, self-employment or farming. EITC reduces the amount of tax you owe and may also give you a refund. IRS Publication 596, Earned Income Credit, has more details.

5. Adoption Credit You may be able to take a tax credit for qualifying expenses paid to adopt an eligible child. If you claim the adoption credit, you must file a paper tax return with required adoption-related documents.  For details, see the instructions for IRS Form 8839, Qualified Adoption Expenses.

6. Children with earned income If your child has income earned from working, they may be required to file a tax return. For more information, see IRS Publication 501.

7. Children with investment income Under certain circumstances a child’s investment income may be taxed at their parent’s tax rate. For more information, see IRS Publication 929, Tax Rules for Children and Dependents.

8. Higher education credits Education tax credits can help offset the costs of higher education. The American Opportunity and the Lifetime Learning Credits are education credits that can reduce your federal income tax dollar-for-dollar. See IRS Publication 970, Tax Benefits for Education, for details.

9. Student loan interest You may be able to deduct interest paid on a qualified student loan, even if you do not itemize your deductions. For more information, see IRS Publication 970.

10. Self-employed health insurance deduction If you were self-employed and paid for health insurance, you may be able to deduct any premiums you paid for coverage for any child of yours who was under age 27 at the end of the year, even if the child was not your dependent.

eitc

IRS Proposed Regulations to File Due Diligence Checklist with All EITC Claims in 2012

IRS Issues Proposed Regulations That Would Require Tax Preparers to File Due Diligence Checklist with All EITC Claims Submitted in 2012

WASHINGTON —The Internal Revenue Service announced today that it is issuing proposed regulations that would require paid tax return preparers, beginning in 2012, to file a due diligence checklist, Form 8867, with any federal return claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). It is the same form that is currently required to be completed and retained in a preparer’s records.

The due diligence requirement, enacted by Congress over a decade ago, was designed to reduce errors on returns claiming the EITC, most of which are prepared by tax professionals.

The IRS created Form 8867, Paid Preparer’s Earned Income Credit Checklist, to help preparers meet the requirement by obtaining eligibility information from their clients. Preparers have been required to keep copies of the form, or comparable documentation, which is subject to review by the IRS. To help ensure compliance with the law and that eligible taxpayers receive the right credit amount, the proposed regulations would require preparers, effective Jan. 1, 2012, to file the Form 8867 with each return claiming the EITC.

 

IRS Proposed Regulations to File Due Diligence Checklist with All EITC Claims in 2012

Further details can be found in REG-140280-09. Comments on the proposed regulations are due by Nov. 10, 2011, and a public hearing on the proposed regulations is scheduled for Nov. 7, 2011.

The EITC benefits low-and moderate-income workers and working families and the tax benefit varies by income, family size and filing status. Unlike most deductions and credits, the EITC is refundable –– taxpayers can get it even if they owe no tax. For 2011 tax returns, the maximum credit will be $5,751.

Although as many as one in five eligible taxpayers fail to claim the EITC, some of those who do claim it either compute it incorrectly or are ineligible. The IRS is proposing this step as part of its efforts to ensure that the credit is afforded to taxpayers who qualify. For 2009, over 26 million people received nearly $59 billion through the EITC. Tax professionals prepare close to 66 percent of these claims.

EIC Changes: Preview of Tax Year 2010

EIC or EITC is a refundable tax credit, meaning you can get money back even if you owe no federal income tax or had no tax withheld. And, if you owe tax, it can offset the amount you must pay. Below is a preview of the new 2010 earning limits and maximum credit amounts. This information was valid for the EITC in the 2010 tax year.

 

Note: The 2010 EIC Table is now available.

Earned income and adjusted gross income (AGI) must each be less than:

  • $43,352 ($48,362 married filing jointly) with three or more qualifying children
  • $40,363 ($45,373 married filing jointly) with two qualifying children
  • $35,535 ($40,545 married filing jointly) with one qualifying child
  • $13,460 ($18,470 married filing jointly) with no qualifying children

 

Tax Year 2010 maximum credit:

  • $5,666 with three or more qualifying children
  • $5,036 with two qualifying children
  • $3,050 with one qualifying child
  • $457 with no qualifying children

*The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) provides a temporary increase in EITC and expands the credit for workers with three or more qualifying children. These changes are temporary and apply to 2009 and 2010 tax years.

 

EIC Changes: Preview of Tax Year 2010

Investment income must be $3,100 or less for the year.

The maximum Advance EITC workers can receive from their employers is $1,830.

EITC Awareness Day

An expanded Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) means larger families will qualify for a larger credit, offering greater relief for people who struggled through difficult financial times last year, the Internal Revenue Service said today.

The IRS and the Treasury Department marked EITC Awareness Day as their partners nationwide worked to highlight the availability of this important tax credit. EITC, which is in its thirty-fifth year, is one of the federal government’s largest benefit programs for working families and individuals. Last year, nearly 24 million people received $50 Billion in benefits. The average credit was more than $2,000.

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“As part of the economic recovery efforts, there have been important changes to expand EITC to benefit taxpayers,” said IRS Commissioner Doug Shulman. “Today, more than ever, hard-working individuals and families can use a little extra help. EITC can make the lives of working people a little easier.”

 

EITC Awareness Day

Eligibility for EITC depends on earned income and family size, among other tests. However, single people and childless workers also are eligible, although for smaller amounts. For tax years 2009 and 2010, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act created a new category for families with three or more children and expanded the maximum benefit for this category.

To qualify for the EITC, earned income and adjusted gross income (AGI) for individuals must each be less than:

  • $43,279 ($48,279 married filing jointly) with three or more qualifying children
  • $40,295 ($45,295 married filing jointly) with two qualifying children
  • $35,463 ($40,463 married filing jointly) with one qualifying child
  • $13,440 ($18,440 married filing jointly) with no qualifying children

The maximum credit for tax year 2009 is:

  • $5,657 with three or more qualifying children
  • $5,028 with two qualifying children
  • $3,043 with one qualifying child
  • $457 with no qualifying children

The maximum amount of investment income is $3,100 for tax year 2009. For families, there are also certain requirements for child residency and relationship that must be met. Additional eligibility information is available in FS-2010-11 and on the Web at IRS.gov/EITC.

Another new provision adds to the definition of a “qualifying child:” The child must be younger than the person claiming the child unless the child is totally and permanently disabled any time during the year. The child cannot have filed a joint return other than to claim a refund. Also new for 2009, if a qualifying child can be claimed by either a parent or another person, the other person must have an AGI higher than the parent in order to claim the child for EITC purposes.

Historically, one in four eligible taxpayers fails to claim the EITC, which is why the IRS and its free tax preparation partners host an annual EITC Awareness Day. This year, there are 68 news conferences being held around the country. Community coalitions and IRS partners nationwide also are also issuing 128 news releases, writing letters to the editor and using social media tools to spread the word about EITC.

Typically, people who fail to claim the EITC include workers without qualifying children, people whose earned income falls below the threshold required to file a tax return, farmers, rural residents, people with disabilities and nontraditional families such as grandparents raising grandchildren. People must file a tax return to claim the EITC.

EITC-eligible taxpayers also can seek assistance at the 400 IRS Taxpayer Assistance Centers nationwide. To assist EITC taxpayers, 167 IRS assistance centers will offer Saturday service on Jan. 30, Feb. 6 and Feb. 20.

There is an online EITC Assistant also available on IRS.gov which can help taxpayers and tax preparers determine eligibility.

More than 65 percent of EIC returns are prepared by a third party. The IRS urges taxpayers to choose a reputable tax preparer to avoid problems that come with an inaccurate tax return. The agency also urges tax preparers to follow due diligence requirements when preparing an EIC tax return.

IRS EITC Awareness

The IRS, the Department of Treasury and other non-government partners are kicking off EITC (Earned Income Credit) Awareness to promote the refundable tax credit for low-wage workers with children. There is special day held once a year to promote this important tax initiative to help families earning below a certain income limit and are eligible for the EITC.

Believe it or not, there are many taxpayers who are eligible to receive the Earned Income Credit, but fail to claim it simply because they are not informed,” claimed U.S. Treasurer Anna Escobedo Cabral.

According to IRS data, over 22.4 million taxpayers received more than $43.7 billion from the EITC last year. However, they estimate that approximately one in four eligible taxpayers fail to claim the EITC.

Ensuring that more eligible families receive their EITC is important this year, as it is every year. I encourage people all across America to check to see if you are eligible for the Earned Income Tax Credit,” said Treasury Secretary Henry M. Paulson, Jr.

 

IRS EITC Awareness

IRS invites community organizations, elected officials, state and local governments, schools, employers, and other interested parties to join a national grassroots effort on EITC Awareness Day, January 30, 2015, to spotlight EITC. IRS estimates four of five eligible taxpayers claim and get this important credit. Help ensure everyone gets the EITC they earned.  Best of all, EITC is a financial boost for working people and your local economy.

 

EITC is for workers whose income does not exceed the following limits in 2014:

  • $46,997 ($52,427 married filing jointly) with three or more qualifying children
  • $43,756 ($49,186 married filing jointly) with two qualifying children
  • $38,511 ($43,941 married filing jointly) with one qualifying child
  • $14,590 ($20,020 married filing jointly) with no qualifying children
  • ** Investment income must be $3,350 or less.

EITC can be a boost to you, your family and community. Anyone with earnings of $52,427 or less should see if they qualify at www.irs.gov/eitc or visit a volunteer tax assistance site.

Four of five eligible workers claim and get their EITC. We want to raise that number to five out of five. You earned it, “now file, claim it and get it.” See if you qualify at www.irs.gov/eitc.

 

Workers at risk for overlooking claiming the EITC include:

  • Living in non-traditional homes, such as a grandparent raising a grandchild
  • Whose earnings declined or whose marital or parental status changed
  • Without children
  • With limited English skills
  • Living in rural areas
  • Who are Native Americans
  • With earnings below the filing requirement
  • Who have disabilities or are raising children with disabilities

 

If you qualify for the Federal EITC, you may also be eligible for a similar credit from your state or local government. Twenty-four states, plus local municipalities including the District of Columbia, New York City and Montgomery County, Maryland, offer residents an earned income tax credit for 2014.