direct-deposit

Tax Refund Direct Deposit Options

Direct deposit options include deposit into your savings, checking, retirement account or split refunds into two or three accounts and new in 2010 to purchase Treasury / Savings Bonds.

 

Tax Refund Direct Deposit

Using direct deposit of your tax refund ias simple. You just enter your account number and your nine digit ACH/Routing number into your tax return.

Direct deposit is safer, because the money goes directly into your account so no lost checks. The direct deposit usually means you will get your refund a week sooner as well, in some cases in as little as ten days.

 

Splitting Tax Refunds

You may want to split your refund into two or three different accounts. As an example you may want some of your refund to go into savings, some into your checking and some into a retirement fund. Other examples of financial accounts eligible to receive deposits include health savings accounts and Coverdell education savings accounts.

Some prepaid Visa accounts will also let you make a direct deposit into them, check with your account holder to see if this is possible.

Splitting a refund requires tax Form 8888, Direct Deposit of Refund to More Than One Account, to split a tax refund into two or three financial accounts. The form provides instructions.

 

Buying Savings Bonds with Tax Refunds – Form 8888

New in 2010 is the ability to use your tax refund to buy up to $5,000 in low-risk, liquid Treasury Bonds, which earn interest and protect owners against inflation.

The purchased bonds will be issued in the taxpayer’s name. If the refund is a joint refund, the bonds will be issued in the names of both taxpayers. No beneficiary may be selected. The taxpayer need not have a Treasury Direct account to purchase Bonds using this option.

Using Form 8888, the taxpayer enters 043736881 as the routing number and checks the “savings” box. He must use the letters “BONDS” as the account number.
An I Bond request must be a multiple of $50. The taxpayer also needs to designate an account to which he wants the IRS to deposit the balance of his refund. For example, if his refund is $280, the taxpayer can request that $250 be used to purchase I Bonds and that the remaining $30 be deposited into a checking, savings or investment account.

In cases where a refund is an exact multiple of $50 but less than $5,000, the taxpayer may direct that all of the refund be applied to I Bond purchases by filling out the direct deposit information on his tax return and simply not using Form 8888.

The savings bonds will be mailed to the taxpayer.

Bonds will not be purchased in situations where the taxpayer makes an error figuring his refund, or if the bond request is not a multiple of $50 or the refund is offset for any reason. In these cases, the requested purchase will be cancelled and the entire refund mailed to the taxpayer in the form of a check.

Once the IRS has processed a tax return and placed an order for I Bonds, the taxpayer can inquire about the status of his bond purchase by calling the Treasury Retail Securities Site at 1-800-245-2804.

 

Individual Retirement Arrangements and Tax Refunds

Refunds may be deposited directly into previously established traditional IRAs, Roth IRAs and SEP-IRAs. (They may not be deposited into SIMPLE IRAs.)

The taxpayer should check with his financial institution to confirm that it accepts direct deposits as well as inform the trustee of the tax year to which the IRA should be contributed. For example, if a taxpayer intends for a direct deposit to be designated as a 2009 IRA contribution but fails to inform the trustee, the deposit might be designated as a 2010 contribution. The direct deposit contribution to an IRA must be made prior to April 15 in order to apply to the 2010 tax year.

Top 10 Tips for Last Minute Tax Filers

With the tax filing deadline close at hand, here are the top 10 tips for last minute taxpayers still working on their tax return. Sometimes the most frustrating part of preparing your tax return is dealing with unsuccessful attempts to e-file. E-filing your return instead of mailing definitely has some benefits, especially receiving your refund much faster. The Internal Revenue Service can reject your e-filing for a wide range of reasons, which means you’ll need to figure out what went wrong and try again. However, if you implement some basic tips, you may be able to avoid unnecessary e-file rejections.

 

Top 10 Tips for Last Minute Tax Filers

efile Tax Tips

  1. E-file your return. Consider filing electronically instead of using paper tax forms. Choosing to e-file is the best way to ensure your return is accurate and complete.
  2. Review tax ID numbers. Remember to carefully check all identification numbers on your return. Incorrect or illegible Social Security Numbers can delay or reduce a tax refund.
  3. Double-check your figures. Whether you are filing electronically or by paper, review all the amounts you transferred over from your W-2 or 1099.
  4. Review your math. Taxpayers filing paper returns should also double-check that they have correctly figured the refund or balance due and have used the right figure from the tax table.
  5. Sign and date your return. Both spouses must sign a joint return, even if only one had income. Anyone paid to prepare a return must also sign it.
  6. Choose Direct Deposit. To get your refund quicker, select Direct Deposit and the IRS will deposit your refund directly into your bank account.
  7. How to make a payment. People sending a payment should make the check out to “United States Treasury” and should enclose it with, but not attach it to the tax return or the Form 1040-V, Payment Voucher, if used. Write your name, address, SSN, telephone number, tax year and form number on the check or money order.
  8. File an extension. Taxpayers who will not be able to file a return by the April deadline should request an extension of time to file. Remember, the extension of time to file is not an extension of time to pay.
  9. Visit the IRS Web site. IRS.gov has forms, publications and helpful information on a variety of tax subjects, which is available around the clock on the IRS.gov.
  10. Review your return….one more time. Before you seal the envelope or hit send, go over all the information on return again. Errors may delay the processing of your return, so it’s best for you to make sure everything on your return is correct.

 

Common eFile Errors Lead to Rejections

One of the easier e-file rejections to fix is the names reported on your tax forms. When you e-file, the IRS will check to ensure that your name matches the Social Security number (SSN) reported on the form. Another frequent mismatch occurs when there is a name change due to marriage or divorce. If you change your last name, you need to notify the Social Security Administration to get your SSN reassigned to your new name, or risk your e-file being rejected. When you take exemptions for your dependents, your tax form requires their full names, SSNs and the relationship you have with each of them. The IRS e-file system will verify that each dependent’s name matches the corresponding SSN by comparing the information to IRS master files. If it doesn’t match, the IRS will reject your e-filing.

Further, certain tax return filing statuses require additional information on the return other than just marking the appropriate status box. If filing as head of household, for example, one of the eligibility requirements is that you claim at least one dependent on your return. Thus, if you forget to list your dependent or report your dependent’s name or SSN incorrectly, the e-filing system will catch this error and reject your e-file submission

 

Additional IRS Links on eFile:

Form 9465, Installment Agreement Request
Form 1040-V, Payment Voucher
Form 4868, Application for Automatic Extension of Time to File U.S. Individual Income Tax Return

Track Your IRS Tax Refund Online

Wondering where your refund is or when you can expect to recieve it?The IRS should issue your refund check within six to eight weeks of filing a paper return. If you use e-file and you chose to receive your refund through direct deposit, you should receive it within a week. If you use e-file and a check, your refund should be issued between two and three weeks.Track your Refund here.

 

When to check status…

  • Within 24 hours after we’ve received your e-filed tax return
  • 4 weeks after you mail your paper return
  • “Where’s My Refund?” is updated once every 24 hours

 

What you need…

  • Social Security Number
  • Filing status
  • Exact refund amount