Welcome to Tax Season 2009

It is now official, the IRS is now excepting tax returns for 2008!

80 million people used e-file in 2007 (almost 58 percent of all tax returns).
e-file or electronic tax filing has many benefits like:

  • Faster Refunds
  • Greater Accuracy
  • Secure and confidential submission
  • No paper return to mail
  • File now, pay later
  • Quick confirmation

“These are tough times, and e-file is the best way for people to get cash in their pocket quickly,” said IRS Commissioner Doug Shulman. “Filing electronically with direct deposit can get refunds to taxpayers in as few as 10 days.”

IRS e-file meets the needs of nearly all taxpayers, no matter how complicated or simple their returns are. E-file helps taxpayers take advantage of the tax credits available to them to maximize their refunds during these tough economic times.

E-filed tax return information is protected through encryption. Also, taxpayers receive an acknowledgement usually within 48 hours that the IRS has accepted their return.

Click either the Basic return link at the top of the page to start your 1040EZ form or Click on the Start a Regular Tax Return link if you won’t qualify for a 1040 EZ.

Not sure? Then start with the Basic 1040EZ form, if you need to upgrade to the Regular form we will let you know. Please keep in mind if you start with the Regular form you can not downgrade to the Basic.

In general if you are Single or Married with NO children you should start with the Basic 1040EZ.

Earned Income Credit Changes For 2008

Here are the changes to the Earned Income Credit for 2008.

The maximum amount of the Earned Income Credit (EIC) has increased. The most you can get is:

  • $2,917 if you have one qualifying child
  • $4,824 if you have more than one qualifying child or
  • $438 if you do not have a qualifying child.

The maximum amount of income you can earn and still get the credit has also increased for 2008. You may be able to take the credit if:

  • You have more than one qualifying child and you earn less than $38,646 ($41,646 if married filing jointly),
  • You have one qualifying child and you earn less than $33,995 ($36,995 if married filing jointly), or
  • You do not have a qualifying child and you earn less than $12,880 ($15,880 if married filing jointly).

 

Earned Income Credit Changes For 2008

The maximum amount of AGI you can have and still get the credit also has increased. You may be able to take the credit if your AGI is less than the amount in the above list that applies to you.

The maximum amount of investment income you can have and still get the credit has increased to $2,950 for 2008.

If you get advance payments of the credit from your employer with your pay check, the total advance payments you get during 2008 can be as much as $1,750.

Nontaxable combat pay election

You can elect to include your nontaxable combat pay in earned income when you figure your earned income credit for 2008. This election was due to expire at the end of 2007 but has been extended to years after 2007.

2009 EIC Chart – 2009 EIC Chart
Download 2008 Earned Income Credit Pub 596

2008 Tax Guide

Download IRS 2008 Tax Guide For Individuals

2008 Tax Guide
2008 Tax Guide

The IRS has placed its comprehensive tax guide for individuals on IRS.gov, updating it for tax year 2008. The updated on-line version of IRS Publication 17, “Your Federal Income Tax,” contains more than 900 interactive links.

Publication 17 has been updated with important changes for 2008, including information on the new recovery rebate credit, new first-time-homebuyer credit, and an additional standard deduction for real estate taxes. It has been published annually by the IRS for more than 65 years and has been available on the IRS Web site since 1996.

 

Download IRS 2008 Tax Guide For Individuals

As in prior years, the publication provides information on how to file an individual tax return, what to include as income, how to calculate capital gains and losses, how IRAs and other expenses can affect how much income to report, whether to take the standard deduction or itemize, and how to figure taxes and credits.

Download: Publication 17

Publication 17 is available on line, however, for those who do not have access to the Internet can call 1-800-829-3676 to request a free copy from the IRS. Printed copies will be available in January 2009.

IRS Newswire

Top 2008 Tax Scams

Phishing Scams, Frivolous Arguments
Top the 2008 ‘Dirty Dozen’ Tax Scams

 

WASHINGTON – The Internal Revenue Service today issued its
2008 list of the 12 most egregious tax schemes and scams, highlighted by
Internet phishing scams and several frivolous tax arguments.

 

Topping this year s list of scams is phishing, which
encompasses numerous Internet-based ploys to steal financial information
from taxpayers.   New to the Dirty Dozen this year is a
scheme, which IRS auditors discovered, that relates to unreasonable and/or
excessive fuel tax credit claims.

Top 2008 Tax Scams

Taxpayers should be wary of scams and promises to avoid paying taxes
that seem too good to be true, Acting IRS Commissioner Linda Stiff
said.  There is no secret formula that can eliminate a person s tax
obligations.   People should be wary of anyone peddling any of
these scams.

 

Tax schemes can lead to problems for both scam artists and
taxpayers.   Tax return preparers and promoters also risk
significant penalties, interest and possible criminal prosecution.

 

The IRS urges taxpayers to avoid these common schemes:

 

1.  Phishing

 

Phishing is a tactic used by Internet-based thieves to trick
unsuspecting victims into revealing personal information they can then use
to access the victims financial accounts.   These criminals use
the information obtained to empty the victims bank accounts, run up
credit card charges and apply for loans or credit in the victims names.
Phishing scams often take the form of an e-mail that appears to come from
a legitimate source. Some scam e-mails falsely claim to come from the
IRS.   To date, taxpayers have forwarded more than 33,000 of
these scam e-mails, reflecting more than 1,500 different schemes, to the
IRS.   The IRS never uses e-mail to contact taxpayers about
their tax issues.   Taxpayers who receive unsolicited e-mail
that claims to be from the IRS can forward the message to a special
electronic mailbox, phishing@irs.gov, using instructions
contained in an article titled How to
Protect Yourself from Suspicious E-Mails or Phishing
Schemes. Remember: the only official IRS Web site is located at www.irs.gov.

 

2.  Scams Related to the Economic Stimulus
Payment

 

Some scam artists are trying to trick individuals into revealing
personal financial information that can be used to access their financial
accounts by making promises relating to the economic stimulus payment,
often called a rebate.   To obtain the payment, eligible individuals
in most cases will not have to do anything more than file a 2007 federal
tax return.   But some criminals posing as IRS representatives
are trying to trick taxpayers into revealing their personal financial
information by falsely telling them they must provide information to get a
payment.  For instance, a potential victim is told by phone or e-mail
that he or she is eligible for a rebate but must provide a bank account
number (or similar information) to get the payment.   If the
target is unwilling, the victim is then told that he cannot receive the
rebate unless the information is provided.   Individuals should
remember that the only way to get a stimulus payment is to file a 2007 tax
return.  The IRS urges taxpayers to be extra-vigilant.
The IRS will not contact taxpayers by phone or e-mail about their stimulus
payment.

 

3.  Frivolous Arguments

 

Promoters of frivolous schemes encourage people to make unreasonable
and unfounded claims to avoid paying the taxes they owe.   Most
recently, the IRS expanded its list of frivolous legal positions that
taxpayers should stay away from.   Taxpayers who file a tax
return or make a submission based on one of these positions on the list
are subject to a $5,000 penalty.   The most recent update of the
list of frivolous positions includes: misinterpretation of the 9th
Amendment to the U.S. Constitution regarding objections to military
spending, erroneous claims that taxes are owed only by persons with a
fiduciary relationship to the United States, a nonexistent Mariner s Tax
Deduction related to invalid deductions for meals and the misuse of the
fuel tax credit (see below).   The complete
list of frivolous arguments is on the IRS Web site at IRS.gov.

 

4.  Fuel Tax Credit Scams

 

The IRS is receiving claims for the fuel tax credit that are
unreasonable.   Some taxpayers, such as farmers who use fuel for
off-highway business purposes, may be eligible for the fuel tax
credit.  But some individuals are claiming the tax credit for
nontaxable uses of fuel when their occupation or income level makes the
claim unreasonable.   Fraud involving the fuel tax credit was
recently added to the list of frivolous tax claims, potentially subjecting
those who improperly claim the credit to a $5,000 penalty.

 

5.  Hiding Income Offshore

 

Individuals continue to try to avoid paying U.S.taxes by illegally
hiding income in offshore bank and brokerage accounts or using offshore
debit cards, credit cards, wire transfers, foreign trusts, employee
leasing schemes, private annuities or life insurance plans.
The IRS and the tax agencies of U.S. states and possessions continue to
aggressively pursue taxpayers and promoters involved in such abusive
transactions.

 

6.  Abusive Retirement Plans

 

The IRS continues to uncover abuses in retirement plan arrangements,
including Roth Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs).  The IRS is
looking for transactions that taxpayers are using to avoid the limitations
on contributions to Roth IRAs.   Taxpayers should be wary of
advisers who encourage them to shift appreciated assets into Roth IRAs or
companies owned by their Roth IRAs at less than fair market
value.   In one variation of the scheme, a promoter has the
taxpayer move a highly appreciated asset into a Roth IRA at cost value,
which is below annual contribution limits even though the fair market
value far exceeds the amount allowed.

 

7.  Zero Wages

 

Filing a phony wage- or income-related information return to replace a
legitimate information return has been used as an illegal method to lower
the amount of taxes owed.   Typically, a Form 4852 (Substitute
Form W-2) or a corrected Form 1099 is used as a way to improperly reduce
taxable income to zero.   The taxpayer also may submit a
statement rebutting wages and taxes reported by a payer to the IRS.
Sometimes fraudsters even include an explanation on their Form 4852 that
cites statutory language on the definition of wages or may include some
reference to a paying company that refuses to issue a corrected Form W-2
for fear of IRS retaliation. Taxpayers should resist any temptation to
participate in any of the variations of this scheme.

 

8.  False Claims for Refund and Requests for
Abatement

 
This scam involves a request for abatement of previously assessed
tax using Form 843, Claim for Refund and Request for Abatement.
Many individuals who try this have not previously filed tax
returns.   The tax they are trying to have abated has been
assessed by the IRS through the Substitute for Return Program.
The filer uses Form 843 to list reasons for the request. Often, one of the
reasons given is “Failed to properly compute and/or calculate Section
83-Property Transferred in Connection with Performance of Service.”

 

9.  Return Preparer Fraud

 

Dishonest tax return preparers can cause many problems for taxpayers
who fall victim to their schemes.   These scam artists make
their money by skimming a portion of their clients refunds and charging
inflated fees for return preparation services. They attract new clients by
promising large refunds.   Some preparers promote the filing of
fraudulent claims for refunds on items such as fuel tax credits to recover
taxes paid in prior years. Taxpayers should choose carefully when hiring a
tax preparer, especially one who promises something that seems too good to
be true.

 

10.  Diguised Corporate Ownership

 

Some people are going as far as forming domestic shell corporations in
certain states for the purpose of disguising the ownership of a business
or financial activity.   Once formed, these anonymous entities
can be used to facilitate underreporting of income, non-filing of tax
returns, engaging in listed transactions, money laundering, financial
crimes and even terrorist financing.   The IRS is working with
state authorities to identify these entities and to bring the owners of
these entities into compliance.

 

11.  Misuse of Trusts

 

For years, unscrupulous promoters have urged taxpayers to transfer
assets into trusts. They promise reduction of income subject to tax,
deductions for personal expenses and reduced estate or gift
taxes.   However, some trusts do not deliver the promised tax
benefits.   As with other arrangements, taxpayers should seek
the advice of a trusted professional before entering into a trust.

 

12.  Abuse of Charitable Organizations and
Deductions

 

The IRS continues to observe the misuse of tax-exempt organizations.
Misuse includes arrangements to improperly shield income or assets from
taxation, attempts by donors to maintain control over donated assets or
income from donated property and overvaluation of contributed
property.   In addition, IRS examiners are seeing an upturn in
instances where taxpayers try to disguise private tuition payments as
contributions to charitable or religious organizations.

 

IRS Watches Scams That Fall Off the List

 

While the IRS has seen a decline in the occurrence of some of these
scams, other problems, such as abuse of the American Indian Employment
Credit and misuse of structured entity credits, continue to be areas of
concern.   The absence of a particular scheme from the Dirty
Dozen should not be taken as an indication that the IRS is unaware of it
or not taking steps to counter it.

 

How to Report Suspected Tax Fraud Activity

 

Suspected tax fraud can be reported to the IRS using IRS Form 3949-A,
Information Referral. Form 3949-A is available for download from the IRS
Web site at IRS.gov.   The completed form or a letter detailing
the alleged fraudulent activity should be addressed to the Internal
Revenue Service, Fresno, CA 93888.  The mailing should include
specific information about who is being reported, the activity being
reported, how the activity became known, when the alleged violation took
place, the amount of money involved and any other information that might
be helpful in an investigation.   The person filing the report
is not required to self-identify, although it is helpful to do so. The
identity of the person filing the report can be kept confidential.

 

Whistleblowers also could provide allegations of fraud to the IRS and
may be eligible for a reward by filing Form 211, Application
for Award for Original Information, and following the procedures outlined
in Notice 2008-4, Claims Submitted to the IRS Whistleblower Office under Section
7623.

2008 Tax Rebate – New Information Released

tax-form.pngWASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service released additional information today about the upcoming economic stimulus payments (2008 Tax Rebate) in a specially designed section for taxpayers on IRS.gov.

The new information includes an extensive set of Frequently Asked Questions about the stimulus payments, with a special emphasis on recipients of Social Security and certain veterans’ benefits. Millions of people in this group who normally don’t file a tax return will need to do so this year in order to receive a stimulus payment.

For recipients of Social Security and certain veterans’ benefits and low-income workers who don’t normally need to file, the IRS also released a special version of a Form 1040A that highlights the simple, specific sections of the return that can be filled out by people in these categories to qualify for a stimulus payment.

“Most taxpayers just need to file a 2007 tax return in order to automatically receive the stimulus payment,” said Acting IRS Commissioner Linda Stiff. “But we are especially concerned about recipients of Social Security and veterans’ benefits who may need to take special steps this year to file a tax return in order to obtain a stimulus payment. IRS.gov will help taxpayers get what they need.”

 

2008 Tax Rebate – New Information Released

The Frequently Asked Questions section – accessible through the front page of IRS.gov — includes an extensive set of information for all taxpayers with questions about the stimulus payments, commonly referred to as rebates. The questions and answers include important information for low-income workers and certain recipients of Social Security, Railroad Retirement benefits and veterans’ benefits.

The special IRS.gov section also features extensive examples of how much taxpayers can expect to receive in stimulus payments. The page includes more than two-dozen payment scenarios affecting different types of taxpayers.

IRS.gov will be updated frequently to provide taxpayers with all they need to understand the stimulus payments.

The IRS will begin sending taxpayers their economic stimulus payments in early May after the current tax season concludes. In most cases, the payment will equal the amount of tax liability on the tax return, with a maximum amount of $600 for individuals ($1,200 for married couples who file a joint return). Payments to more than 130 million households will continue over several weeks during the spring and summer. A payment schedule for taxpayers will be announced in the near future on IRS.gov.

The IRS reminds taxpayers when they file their 2007 tax return to use direct deposit, which is the fastest way to get both regular refunds and stimulus payments. However, taxpayers who use Refund Anticipation Loans (RALs) or enter into any other loan or financial agreement with their tax professional cannot receive their stimulus payments by direct deposit and instead will get a paper check.

The only way to receive a stimulus payment in 2008 is to file a 2007 tax return. The vast majority of taxpayers must take no extra steps to receive their stimulus payment beyond the routine filing of their tax return. No other action, extra form or call is necessary.

Special Guidelines for Recipients of Certain Social Security, Veterans and Railroad Benefits

Certain people who normally are not required to file but who are eligible for the stimulus payment will have to file a 2007 tax return. This includes low-income workers or those who receive Social Security benefits or veterans’ disability compensation, pension or survivors’ benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs in 2007. These taxpayers will be eligible to receive a payment of $300 ($600 on a joint return) if they had at least $3,000 of qualifying income.

Qualifying income includes Social Security benefits, certain Railroad Retirement benefits, certain veterans’ benefits and earned income, such as income from wages, salaries, tips and self-employment. For taxpayers filing joint tax returns, only a total of $3,000 of qualifying income from both spouses is required to be eligible for a payment.

The special version of the Form 1040A unveiled today on IRS.gov shows taxpayers in these groups the specific sections of the form they need to fill out to qualify for the stimulus payment. The mock-up is designed to be used as a guide for filling out an actual Form 1040A.

“People who don’t normally need to file have a roadmap on how to fill out the Form 1040A quickly and easily,” Stiff said. “We encourage recipients of Social Security and veterans’ benefits who don’t normally need to file a tax return to use this mock-up of the form as a guide to help them get their stimulus payment.”

The Form 1040A illustration on IRS.gov shows the limited number of lines that will need to be filled out for recipients of Social Security, certain Railroad Retirement and certain veterans’ benefits. A key line is reporting their 2007 benefits on Line 14a of Form 1040A. The IRS reminds taxpayers they can also use Line 20a on Form 1040 to report these same benefits.

In addition, taxpayers in these groups should write the words “Stimulus Payment” at the top of the 1040A or 1040.

For now, taxpayers in this group filing a tax return can only file a paper copy of the Form 1040 or Form 1040A. The IRS is working to update its systems to accept electronic versions of these limited-information returns for taxpayers who otherwise have no need to file a tax return. The IRS is also working with the software community to handle these returns electronically at a future date.

The IRS also reminded taxpayers with Social Security, Railroad Retirement or veterans’ benefits who have already filed but did not report their qualifying benefits on either Line 14a of Form 1040A or Line 20a of Form 1040 that they may need to file an amended return in some situations to receive a larger stimulus payment.

Taxpayers who already have filed but did not report these benefits can file an amended return by using Form 1040X, which can only be filed with a paper form.

The IRS reminded taxpayers who don’t have any other requirement to file a tax return that submitting a tax return to qualify for the economic stimulus payments does not create any additional tax or trigger a tax bill. In addition, the stimulus payments will not have any effect on eligibility for federal benefits.

The IRS is working with the Social Security Administration and Department of Veterans Affairs and other organizations to ensure that recipients are aware of the need to file a tax return to receive their stimulus payment in 2008.

2008 Tax Rebate to be mailed out in May

IRS Will Send Stimulus Payments Automatically Starting in May; Eligible Taxpayers Must File a 2007 Tax Return to Receive Rebate

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today advised taxpayers that in most cases they will not have to do anything extra this year to get the economic stimulus payments (tax rebate) beginning in May.

“If you are eligible for a payment, all you have to do is file a 2007 tax return and the IRS will do the rest,” said Acting IRS Commissioner Linda Stiff.

The IRS will use information on the 2007 tax return filed by the taxpayer to determine eligibility and calculate the amount of the stimulus payments.

The IRS will begin sending taxpayers their payments in early May after the current tax season concludes. Payments to more than 130 million taxpayers will continue over several weeks during the spring and summer. A payment schedule for taxpayers will be announced in the near future.

 

2008 Tax Rebate to be mailed out in May

Stimulus payments will be direct deposited for taxpayers selecting that option when filing their 2007 tax returns. Taxpayers who have already filed with direct deposit won’t need to do anything else to receive the stimulus payment. For taxpayers who haven’t filed their 2007 returns yet, the IRS reminds them that direct deposit is the fastest way to get both regular refunds and stimulus payments.

Most taxpayers just need to file a 2007 tax return as usual. No other action, extra form or call is necessary. This Web site will be the best information source for all updates and taxpayer questions.

In most cases, the payment will equal the amount of tax liability on the tax return, with a maximum amount of $600 for individuals ($1,200 for taxpayers who file a joint return).

The law also allows for payments for select taxpayers who have no tax liability, such as low-income workers or those who receive Social Security benefits or veterans’ disability compensation, pension or survivors’ benefits received from the Department of Veterans Affairs in 2007. These taxpayers will be eligible to receive a payment of $300 ($600 on a joint return) if they had at least $3,000 of qualifying income.

Qualifying income includes Social Security benefits, certain Railroad Retirement benefits, certain veterans’ benefits and earned income, such as income from wages, salaries, tips and self-employment. While these people may not be normally required to file a tax return because they do not meet the filing requirement, the IRS emphasizes they must file a 2007 return in order to receive a payment.

Recipients of Social Security, certain Railroad Retirement and certain veterans’ benefits should report their 2007 benefits on Line 14a of Form 1040A or Line 20a of Form 1040. Taxpayers who already have filed but failed to report these benefits can file an amended return by using Form 1040X. The IRS is working with the Social Security Administration and Department of Veterans Affairs to ensure that recipients are aware of this issue.

“Some people receiving Social Security and veterans’ benefits may not realize they will need to file a tax return to get the stimulus payment,” Stiff said. “To reach these people, the IRS and Treasury will work closely with the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Social Security Administration and key beneficiary groups on outreach efforts.”

Eligible taxpayers who qualify for a payment will receive an additional $300 for each child who qualifies for the child tax credit.

Payments to higher income taxpayers will be reduced by 5 percent of the amount of adjusted gross income above $75,000 for individuals and $150,000 for those filing jointly.

Taxpayers must have valid Social Security Numbers to qualify for the stimulus payment. If married filing jointly, both taxpayers must have a valid Social Security Number. And, children must have valid Social Security Numbers to be eligible as qualifying children.

Taxpayers who file their tax returns using an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number issued by the IRS or any number issued by the IRS are ineligible. Also ineligible are individuals who can be claimed as dependents on someone else’s return, or taxpayers who file Form 1040-NR, 1040-PR or 1040-SS.

To accommodate taxpayers who file tax returns later in the year, the IRS will continue sending payments until December 31, 2008. The IRS also cautions taxpayers that if they file their 2007 tax return and then move their residence that they should file a change of address card with the U.S. Postal Service.

The IRS will mail two informational notices to taxpayers advising them of the stimulus payments. However, taxpayers should be alert for tax rebate scams such as telephone calls or e-mails claiming to be from the IRS and asking for sensitive financial information. The IRS will not call or e-mail taxpayers about these payments nor will it ask for financial information. Scam e-mails and information about scam calls should be forwarded to phishing@irs.gov.

State Availability for eFile of Tax Returns

As a result of a cooperative effort between the IRS and state tax administration agencies, Federal/State e-file is available to taxpayers to file their Federal and state returns electronically at the same time. It is available to you through tax professionals or in most states by filing from your home computer. Find your state below to determine when return processing will be available for your state.

 

State Availability for eFile of Tax Returns

Federal/State e-file allows the electronic filing of both Federal and state income tax returns at the same time. The electronic filing software places your Federal and state return data in separate packets. These packets are transmitted to the IRS in one taxpayer “envelope.” The IRS functions as an electronic post office for the participant state, who receives and processes the state electronic return.

Can I pay both Federal and State balance in one transaction?
Federal tax payments can be made via electronic funds withdrawal or credit card.  Most states are accepting electronic funds withdrawal and credit card payments, but federal and state payments are not combined. For additional information contact your state e-file coordinator .

Note: If your state has not begun processing, you can file your federal return now and come back to finish your state at a later time (*Except AR, HI and OK).

State Availability dates

Alabama – Available Now
Alaska – No State Tax
Arizona – Available Now
Arkansas – Available Now
California – Available Now
Colorado – Available Now
Connecticut – Available Now
Delaware – Available Now
District of Columbia – Available Now
Florida – No State Tax
Georgia – Available Now
Hawaii – Available Now
Idaho – Available Now
Illinois – Available Now
Indiana – Available Now
Iowa – Available Now
Kansas – Available Now
Kentucky – Available Now
Louisiana – Available Now
Maine – Available Now
Maryland – Available Now
Massachusetts – Available Now
Michigan – Available Now
Minnesota – Available Now
Mississippi – Available Now
Missouri – Available Now
Montana – Available Now
Nebraska – Available Now
Nevada – No State Tax
New Hampshire – Available Now
New Jersey – Available Now
New Mexico – Available Now
New York – Available Now
North Carolina – Available Now
North Dakota – Available Now
Ohio – Available Now
Oklahoma – Available Now
Oregon – Available Now
Pennsylvania – Available Now
Rhode Island – Available Now
South Carolina – Available Now
South Dakota – No State Tax
Tennessee – Available Now
Texas – No State Tax
Utah – Available Now
Vermont – Available Now
Virginia – Available Now
Washington – No State Tax
West Virginia – Available Now
Wisconsin – Available Now
Wyoming – No State Tax

To learn about your state and how it is partnering with the IRS, select a category and the provided link for each state.

2008 IRS eFile Refund Cycle Chart

The IRS does not guarantee a specific date that a refund will be deposited into a taxpayer’s bank account.

IRS Acceptance Date
(by 11:00 am) between…

Direct Deposit Sent*

Paper Check Mailed*

Jan 11 and Jan 17 2008

Jan 25, 2008

Feb 1, 2008

Jan 17 and Jan 24 2008

Feb 1, 2008

Feb 8, 2008

Jan 24 and Jan 31 2008

Feb 8, 2008

Feb 15, 2008

Jan 31 and Feb 7 2008

Feb 15, 2008

Feb 22, 2008

Feb 7 and Feb 14 2008

Feb 22, 2008

Feb 29, 2008

Feb 14 and Feb 21 2008

Feb 29, 2008

Mar 7, 2008

Feb 21 and Feb 28 2008

Mar 7, 2008

Mar 14, 2008

Feb 28 and Mar 6 2008

Mar 14, 2008

Mar 21, 2008

Mar 6 and Mar 13 2008

Mar 21, 2008

Mar 28, 2008

Mar 13 and Mar 20 2008

Mar 28, 2008

Apr 4, 2008

Mar 20 and Mar 27 2008

Apr 4, 2008

Apr 11, 2008

Mar 27 and Apr 3 2008

Apr 11, 2008

Apr 18, 2008

Apr 3 and Apr 10 2008

Apr 18, 2008

Apr 25, 2008

Apr 10 and Apr 17 2008

Apr 25, 2008

May 2, 2008

Apr 17 and Apr 24 2008

May 2, 2008

May 9, 2008

Apr 24 and May 1 2008

May 9, 2008

May 16, 2008

May 1 and May 8 2008

May 16, 2008

May 23, 2008

May 8 and May 15 2008

May 23, 2008

May 30, 2008

May 15 and May 22 2008

May 30, 2008

June 6, 2008

May 22 and May 29 2008

June 6, 2008

June 13, 2008

May 29 and June 5 2008

June 13, 2008

June 20, 2008

June 5 and June 12 2008

June 20, 2008

June 27, 2008

June 12 and June 19 2008

June 27, 2008

July 4, 2008

June 19 and June 26 2008

July 4, 2008

July 11, 2008

June 26 and July 3 2008

July 11, 2008

July 18, 2008

July 3 and July 10 2008

July 18, 2008

July 25, 2008

July 10 and July 17 2008

July 25, 2008

Aug 1, 2008

July 17 and July 24 2008

Aug 1, 2008

Aug 8, 2008

July 24 and Jul 31 2008

Aug 8, 2008

Aug 15, 2008

Jul 31 and Aug 7 2008

Aug 15, 2008

Aug 22, 2008

Aug 7 and Aug 14 2008

Aug 22, 2008

Aug 29, 2008

Aug 14 and Aug 21 2008

Aug 29, 2008

Sep 5, 2008

Aug 21 and Aug 28 2008

Sep 5, 2008

Sep 12, 2008

Aug 28 and Sep 4 2008

Sep 12, 2008

Sep 19, 2008

Sep 4 and Sep 11 2008

Sep 19, 2008

Sep 26, 2008

Sep 11 and Sep 18 2008

Sep 26, 2008

Oct 3, 2008

Sep 18 and Sep 25 2008

Oct 3, 2008

Oct 10, 2008

Sep 25 and Oct 2 2008

Oct 10, 2008

Oct 17, 2008

Oct 2 and Oct 9 2008

Oct 17, 2008

Oct 24, 2008

Oct 9 and Oct 16 2008

Oct 24, 2008

Oct 31, 2008

Oct 16 and Oct 23 2008

Oct 31, 2008

Nov 7, 2008

*The IRS does not guarantee a specific date that a refund will be deposited or mailed.

2008 IRS eFile Refund Cycle Chart

Taxpayer should wait at least three weeks from the time the electronic return is accepted by the IRS before checking the status of a tax refund. To check the status of a tax refund, call 1-800-829-4477 (toll free) or check the official IRS website www.irs.gov