Top Ten Things You Should Know About Making Federal Tax Payments

Will you be making a payment with your federal tax return this year?
If so, here is what you need to know about making tax payments correctly.

 

Top Ten Things You Should Know About Making Federal Tax Payments

  1. Never send cash!
  2. If you file electronically, you can efile and pay in a single step by authorizing an electronic funds withdrawal via our tax preparation service, tax preparation software or a tax professional.
  3. You can pay by phone or online using a credit or debit card whether you file a paper return or electronically.
  4. Electronic payment options provide an alternative to paying taxes or user fees by check or money order. You can make payments 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Visit IRS.gov and search e-pay, or refer to Publication 3611, e-File Electronic Payments for more details.
  5. If you itemize, you may be able to deduct the convenience fee charged for paying individual income taxes with a credit or debit card as a miscellaneous itemized deduction. The deduction is subject to the 2 percent limit on Form 1040, Schedule A, Itemized Deductions.
  6. Enclose your payment with your return, but do not staple it to the form.
  7. If you pay by check or money order, make sure it is payable to the “United States Treasury.”
  8. Always provide your correct name, address, Social Security number listed first on the tax form, daytime telephone number, tax year and form number on the front of your check or money order.
  9. Complete and include Form 1040-V, Payment Voucher, when sending your payment and tax return to the IRS. This will help the IRS process your payment accurately and efficiently.
  10. For more information, call 800-829-4477 for TeleTax Topic 158, “Ensuring Proper Credit of Payments.” You can also find out more in Publication 17, Your Federal Income Tax and Form 1040-V, both are available below.

Links:

Form 1040-V, Payment Voucher
Form 1040-ES, Estimated Tax for Individuals

Publication 17, Your Federal Income Tax

Nine Common Errors Made on Tax Returns

Errors made on tax returns may delay the processing of your return and the arrival of your tax refund. Avoiding the common errors below will help ensure your refund arrives on time:

 

Nine Common Errors Made on Tax Returns

  1. Recovery Rebate Credit – Many returns filed in 2009 have errors involving the Recovery Rebate Credit, a credit for people who did not receive a stimulus payment in 2008 or who did not receive the maximum amount. To avoid delays in tax refunds, it is critical that taxpayers know whether they received a payment in 2008 and the correct amount of that stimulus payment. For people using a paper tax return, the stimulus payment amount will be required when completing the related worksheet. For people using tax software, the stimulus payment amount will be needed as part of the return preparation process.
  2. Incorrect or missing social security numbers – When entering SSNs for anyone listed on your tax return, be sure they are entered exactly as they appear on the social security cards. Incorrect or transposed numbers will cause delays in the processing of your return.
  3. Incorrect or misspelling of dependent’s last name – When entering dependent’s last name on your tax return, ensure they are entered exactly as they appear on the social security cards. Incorrect or misspelling of dependent’s last name will cause delays in processing of your return.
  4. Filing status errors – Make sure you choose the correct filing status for your situation.
  5. Math errors – When preparing paper returns you should review all addition and subtraction to ensure it is correct. Remember, when you file electronically, the software takes care of the math for you!
  6. Computation errors – Take your time. Many taxpayers are making mistakes when figuring the taxable income, withholding and estimated tax payments, Earned Income Credit, Standard Deduction for age 65 or over or blind, the taxable amount of social security benefits, and child and dependent care credit.
  7. Incorrect bank account numbers for Direct Deposit – If you are due a refund and requested direct deposit did you check your financial institution routing and account numbers? Double and then triple check these numbers!
  8. Forgetting to sign and date the return – An unsigned tax return is like an unsigned check – it is invalid.
  9. Incorrect Adjusted Gross Income information – Taxpayers filing electronically must sign the return electronically using a personal identification number. To verify their identity taxpayers will be prompted to enter their AGI from their originally filed 2007 federal income tax return or their prior year PIN if they used one to file electronically last year. Taxpayers should not use an AGI amount from an amended return, Form 1040X, or a math error correction made by IRS.

Top 10 Tips about IRA Contributions

IRA retirements accounts are a great way to plan for retirement. As the years winds down, it is important to begin assessing what kind of contributions you may be making to a retirement plan. You can contribute to your traditional IRA at any time during the year. You must make all contributions by the due date for filing your tax return. This due date does not include extensions. For most people this means you must contribute for 2012 by April 15, 2013. If you contribute between Jan. 1 and April 15, you should contact your IRA plan sponsor to make sure they apply it to the right year.

 

Top 10 Tips about IRA Contributions

The great thing about a traditional IRA is that, even if you make contributions in the following tax year, the IRS lets you take a deduction for some of these IRA contributions on your prior-year tax return (you must make the contributions by mid-April). In other words, if you are filing your 2014 taxes, the contributions you make to a traditional IRA through mid-April of 2015 may be deductible. This is why your account administrator has until May 31 to send Form 5498 to you.

There is still time to make contributions to your traditional Individual Retirement Arrangement, better known as an IRA.

 

Below are the top ten things you should know about money you put aside for retirement in an IRA.

  1. You may be able to deduct some or all of your contributions to your IRA and you also may be eligible for a tax credit equal to a percentage of your contribution.
  2. Contributions can be made to your traditional IRA at any time during the year or by the due date for filing your return for that year, not including extensions. For most people, this means contributions for 2008 must be made by April 15, 2009.
  3. The amount of funds in your IRA are generally not taxed until you receive distributions from that IRA.
  4. To figure your deduction for IRA contributions, use the worksheets in the instructions for the form you are filing.
  5. For 2008, the most that can be contributed to your traditional IRA generally is the smaller of the following amounts: $5,000 or the amount of your taxable compensation for the year. Taxpayers who are 50 or older can contribute up to $6,000.
  6. Use Form 8880, Credit for Qualified Retirement Savings Contributions, to determine whether you are also eligible for a tax credit.
  7. You cannot deduct an IRA contribution or claim the Credit for Qualified Retirement Saving Contributions on Form 1040EZ; you must use either Form 1040A or Form 1040.
  8. To contribute to a traditional IRA, you must be under age 70 1/2 at the end of the tax year.
  9. You must have taxable compensation, such as wages, salaries, commissions and tips. If you file a joint return, only one of you needs to have compensation.
  10. Refer to IRS Publication 590, Individual Retirement Arrangements, for information on the amounts you will be eligible to contribute to your IRA account.

You may also qualify for the Savers Credit, formally known as the Retirement Savings Contributions Credit. The credit can reduce your taxes up to $1,000 (up to $2,000 if filing jointly). Use Form 8880, Credit for Qualified Retirement Savings Contributions, to claim the Saver’s Credit.

You can get a traditional IRA if you’re under age 70 1/2 and receive taxable compensation.

  • Wages, salaries, and tips
  • Sales commissions
  • Professional fees
  • Bonuses
  • Self-employment income
  • Military compensation while serving in a combat zone tax-exclusion area
  • Alimony or separate maintenance payments included in gross income

 

Income not included as compensation for IRA purposes includes:

  • Profit from the sale of stocks or other property
  • Rental income
  • Pension or annuity income
  • Deferred compensation

Both Form 8880 and Publication 590 can be downloaded below or ordered by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).

 

Additional IRS Resources on IRA Accounts:

Top 10 Tips for Last Minute Tax Filers

With the tax filing deadline close at hand, here are the top 10 tips for last minute taxpayers still working on their tax return. Sometimes the most frustrating part of preparing your tax return is dealing with unsuccessful attempts to e-file. E-filing your return instead of mailing definitely has some benefits, especially receiving your refund much faster. The Internal Revenue Service can reject your e-filing for a wide range of reasons, which means you’ll need to figure out what went wrong and try again. However, if you implement some basic tips, you may be able to avoid unnecessary e-file rejections.

 

Top 10 Tips for Last Minute Tax Filers

efile Tax Tips

  1. E-file your return. Consider filing electronically instead of using paper tax forms. Choosing to e-file is the best way to ensure your return is accurate and complete.
  2. Review tax ID numbers. Remember to carefully check all identification numbers on your return. Incorrect or illegible Social Security Numbers can delay or reduce a tax refund.
  3. Double-check your figures. Whether you are filing electronically or by paper, review all the amounts you transferred over from your W-2 or 1099.
  4. Review your math. Taxpayers filing paper returns should also double-check that they have correctly figured the refund or balance due and have used the right figure from the tax table.
  5. Sign and date your return. Both spouses must sign a joint return, even if only one had income. Anyone paid to prepare a return must also sign it.
  6. Choose Direct Deposit. To get your refund quicker, select Direct Deposit and the IRS will deposit your refund directly into your bank account.
  7. How to make a payment. People sending a payment should make the check out to “United States Treasury” and should enclose it with, but not attach it to the tax return or the Form 1040-V, Payment Voucher, if used. Write your name, address, SSN, telephone number, tax year and form number on the check or money order.
  8. File an extension. Taxpayers who will not be able to file a return by the April deadline should request an extension of time to file. Remember, the extension of time to file is not an extension of time to pay.
  9. Visit the IRS Web site. IRS.gov has forms, publications and helpful information on a variety of tax subjects, which is available around the clock on the IRS.gov.
  10. Review your return….one more time. Before you seal the envelope or hit send, go over all the information on return again. Errors may delay the processing of your return, so it’s best for you to make sure everything on your return is correct.

 

Common eFile Errors Lead to Rejections

One of the easier e-file rejections to fix is the names reported on your tax forms. When you e-file, the IRS will check to ensure that your name matches the Social Security number (SSN) reported on the form. Another frequent mismatch occurs when there is a name change due to marriage or divorce. If you change your last name, you need to notify the Social Security Administration to get your SSN reassigned to your new name, or risk your e-file being rejected. When you take exemptions for your dependents, your tax form requires their full names, SSNs and the relationship you have with each of them. The IRS e-file system will verify that each dependent’s name matches the corresponding SSN by comparing the information to IRS master files. If it doesn’t match, the IRS will reject your e-filing.

Further, certain tax return filing statuses require additional information on the return other than just marking the appropriate status box. If filing as head of household, for example, one of the eligibility requirements is that you claim at least one dependent on your return. Thus, if you forget to list your dependent or report your dependent’s name or SSN incorrectly, the e-filing system will catch this error and reject your e-file submission

 

Additional IRS Links on eFile:

Form 9465, Installment Agreement Request
Form 1040-V, Payment Voucher
Form 4868, Application for Automatic Extension of Time to File U.S. Individual Income Tax Return

10 Tips for Deducting Charitable Contributions

When preparing to file your federal tax return, don’t forget your contributions to charitable organizations. Your donations could add up to a sizable tax deduction if you itemize on IRS Form 1040, Schedule A. If a taxpayer is donating to a qualified charity, this is a very important thing to get right.

You can deduct donations you make to qualified charities. This can reduce your taxable income, but to claim the donations, you have to itemize your deductions. Claim your charitable donations on Form 1040, Schedule A.

 

What are Qualified Charities?

  • Nonprofit religious group
  • Nonprofit educational group
  • Nonprofit charitable group

If your goal is a legitimate tax deduction, then you must be giving to a qualified organization. Also, you cannot deduct contributions made to specific individuals, political organizations and candidates. See IRS Publication 526, Charitable Contributions, for rules on what constitutes a qualified organization.

 

Here are a few tips to ensure your contributions pay off on your tax return:

  1. Contributions must be made to qualified organizations to be deductible. You cannot deduct contributions made to specific individuals, political organizations and candidates.
  2. You cannot deduct the value of your time or services. Nor can you deduct the cost of raffles, bingo or other games of chance.
  3. If your contributions entitle you to merchandise, goods or services, including admission to a charity ball, banquet, theatrical performance or sporting event, you can deduct only the amount that exceeds the fair market value of the benefit received.
  4. Donations of stock or other property are usually valued at the fair market value of the property. Special rules apply to donation of vehicles.
  5. Clothing and household items donated must generally be in good used condition or better to be deductible.
  6. Regardless of the amount, to deduct a contribution of cash, check, or other monetary gift, you must maintain a bank record or a written communication from the organization containing the name of the organization, the date of the contribution and amount of the contribution.
  7. To claim a deduction for contributions of cash or property equaling $250 or more you must obtain a written acknowledgment from the qualified organization showing the amount of the cash and a description of any property contributed, and whether the organization provided any goods or services in exchange for the gift. One document from the organization may satisfy both the written communication requirement for monetary gifts and the written acknowledgment requirement for all contributions of $250 or more.
  8. If you claim a deduction of more than $500 for all contributed property, you must attach IRS Form 8283, Noncash Charitable Contributions, to your return.
  9. Taxpayers donating an item or a group of similar items valued at more than $5,000 must also complete Section B of Form 8283, which requires an appraisal by a qualified appraiser.
  10. Contributions made for relief efforts in a Midwest disaster area receive special benefits. For more information, see Publication 4492-B, Information for Affected Taxpayers in the Midwest Disaster Areas.

 

10 Tips for Deducting Charitable Contributions

For more information on charitable contributions, check out Publication 526, Charitable Contributions, which is available below or by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).

Contributions are deductible in the year made. That means donations charged to a credit card before the end of 2014 are deductible in 2014, even if the credit card bill isn’t paid until 2015. Also, checks mailed on or before Dec. 31, 2014 are deductible for 2014. Many taxpayers aren’t even aware that there are limits on charitable contributions but they do exist. If you contribute more than 20% of your adjusted gross income (AGI, found on line 37 of your form 1040), pay attention to limits. The specific limitations can be fairly complicated – with numerous exceptions – but here are some quick rules of thumb: you can deduct appreciated capital gains assets up to 20% of AGI; you can deduct non-cash assets worth up to 30% of AGI; and you can deduct cash contributions up to 50% of AGI. If you exceed those limits, you can carry the deduction forward for five years.

 

Additional IRS Resources on Charitable Deductions:

 

IRS YouTube Videos on Charitable Tax Deductions:

Checking the Status of Your Federal Tax Refund

If you already filed your federal tax return and are due a refund, you can check the status of your refund online, in English or Spanish.

Where’s My Refund? and ¿Dónde está mi reembolso? are interactive tools on the IRS Web site at IRS.gov. Whether you split your refund among several accounts, opted for direct deposit into one account, or asked the IRS to mail you a check, Where’s My Refund? and ¿Dónde está mi reembolso? give you online access to your refund information nearly 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

 

Checking the Status of Your Federal Tax Refund

If you e-file, you can get refund information 72 hours after IRS acknowledges receipt of your return. If you file a paper return, refund information will be available within three to four weeks. When checking the status of your refund, have your federal tax return handy. To get your personalized refund information you must enter:

  • Your Social Security Number (or Individual Taxpayer Identification Number).
  • Filing status (Single, Married Filing Joint Return, Married Filing Separate Return, Head of Household, or Qualifying Widow(er)).
  • Exact refund amount shown on your tax return.

Once you enter your personal information, you could get several responses, including:

  • Acknowledgment that your return was received and is in processing.
  • The mailing date or direct deposit date of your refund.
  • Notice that the IRS could not deliver your refund due to an incorrect address. In this instance, you can change or correct your address online using Where’s My Refund?


Where’s My Refund?
also includes links to customized information based on your specific situation. The links guide you through the steps to resolve any issues affecting your refund. For example, if you do not get the refund within 28 days from the original IRS mailing date shown on Where’s My Refund?, you can start a refund trace online.

Where’s My Refund? is also accessible to visually impaired taxpayers who use the Job Access with Speech screen reader used with a Braille display and is compatible with different JAWS modes.

If you do not have internet access, you can check the status of your refund by calling the IRS TeleTax System at 800-829-4477 or the IRS Refund Hotline at 800-829-1954. When calling, you must provide your or your spouse’s Social Security number, your filing status and the exact refund amount shown on your return.

Refunds are sent out weekly on Fridays. If you check the status of your refund and are not given the date it will be issued, please wait until the next week before checking back.

Online Tax Preparation

Why choose Online Tax Preparation

As a taxpayer you have many choices when it comes time to file your taxes.

  • You can buy software, install it and file your taxes yourself.
  • Hire an Accountant or a Tax Preparer to file your taxes for you.
  • Use an Online Tax Preparation website and do it yourself.

Let’s take a look at each one of these.

Tax Preparation Software

If you opt for this method you will have to purchase new software every year plus pay any applicable fees for filing your return using their software.

Accountant or Tax Preparer

Choosing this method you will usually have a large fee for the filling out of your tax return and in many cases fees from whatever program or website they use.

I will let you in on a little secret about this method.

Most tax preparers who work out of their home or small business that do this, use the same type of website or software that you could be using yourself.

Quite a few years ago we hired an accountant to do our taxes, he had to leave the room for a few minutes and so I peaked at his computer, guess what I saw?…. He was on the leading tax website; _____tax using their website to do our taxes! He charged us $100 to do our taxes plus we had another $40 or so taken out of our return for him using the website! I wanted to leave right then and there, but the ex-wife…, well we stayed.. enough said. I have been doing my own taxes ever since.

The tax preparer takes your information from your paperwork and just fills in the blanks, just like YOU would be doing yourself in the next type of preparation.

The only people that would require this type of service is people who have a large amount of deductions, combined small business and personal deductions or similar situations.

The vast majority of people filing taxes can do it themselves with very little difficulty. The tax system does all the work, checks the return for errors and efiles the return for the preparer, be it you or a tax professional.

If you are dead set at using a tax preparer do yourself a favor. Try us out for FREE and see what results you get. Then write down your refund amount or what you owe before you visit your tax preparer. When they are done compare what you came up with from our service and what they did. In most cases they will be the same, they might come up with a little more, but remember, you will also be out their fees!

Online Tax Preparation

Online Tax Preparation websites like FileYourtaxesNow.com allows you to file your taxes yourself using the same type of system that tax professionals use. You just gather your w-2s and any other information required and fill in the blanks.

At FileYourTaxesNow.com our system was developed by the makers of one of the number one softwares used by tax professionals and accountants in the USA. You can rest assured that our system will do the best job of filing your taxes correctly while givng you the maximum refund possible.

What if I make a mistake?

Our system will show you any errors on your return and it won’t let you file your return with errors on it.
The key here is to double check your entries to make sure there are NO mistakes in the numbers you entered from your W-2s or other paperwork you have.

Try us for Free!

You don’t have to pay until you officially file your return by efile or you print your return out to file it by mail. Try our easy to use system, see what results you get ~ we believe you will be pleased.

How to efile taxes online

How to efile taxes online?

Step 1 – Get all your tax information together! – You’ll save time and won’t have to stop in the middle of preparing your current year tax return to find a missing document.

Here is what you will need to eFile a Tax Return Online with the IRS using online software to prepare taxes:

  • Social Security numbers for yourself, your spouse, and any dependents.
  • Forms W-2 from all employers are required for yourself and your spouse.
  • Forms 1099 for Dividends, Retirement, or other income, or any Forms 1099 with Income Tax Withholding.
  • Receipts for expenses for Itemized Deductions (Schedule A).
  • Receipts and records for other income or expenses.
  • Bank Account numbers (for a fast refund, or to pay electronically).
  • Prior year Adjusted Gross Income amount or prior year PIN if using a Self-Select PIN as your signature.
  • Complete information on what records you need, and how long to keep your records.

Step 2 – Choose the method of e-filing that works for you:

  • Tax Professional
  • Personal Computer

Step 3 – e-file it!

Paid Preparer – If using a Tax Preparer, be sure to take all your information with you, and don’t forget to ask for IRS e-file!
Personal Computer – Those filing taxes online, just answer the simple questions in our tax preparation software here at File Your Taxes Now, and the software will do the rest for you. For faster refunds, or to pay when YOU want to, have your bank account number handy.

 

Common Features of Software and Online Products that Allow for eFile:

  • Easy-to-understand online interview
  • No income restrictions
  • Supports every filing status
  • Selects the right federal income tax form for you: 1040EZ, 1040A, 1040
  • Calculates capital gain distributions
  • Claim tax credits
  • Claim deductions for IRA contributions, student loan interest, school tuition and fees, etc.
  • Claim itemized deductions
  • Detects and calculates Child Tax Credit
  • Detects and calculates Earned Income Credit (EIC)
  • Report self-employment income
  • Report small business income
  • Report income from sale of a property
  • Error and omission checking (100% accuracy guaranteed)
  • Fast direct bank refund deposit (requires bank account)
  • Pay later – deduct fee from refund (small fee applies)
  • efile for an extension by April 15, 2015
  • Print your completed and IRS accepted return

There is no need for you to select a tax form; it’s all done by the efile.com online tax preparation software. If you need a tax form that is not currently accepted online by the IRS, you can still complete and efile your federal tax return.  Relax. You’re done. Now SHARE – tell a family member or friend IRS e-file is the smart way to electronically file their federal and state income tax returns!

e-Filing

eFile Your 2007 Income Tax Return Electronically

  • Nearly 80 million tax returns were e-filed in 2006! (22.6 million were filed from home computers).
  • Ask us about filing and paying electronically. Filing taxes online and paying electronically gets taxes done more accurately, quickly and efficiently.
  • Electronic tax filing and paying ensures that your tax information arrives and that your history is safe and secure.
  • Direct Deposit of your tax refund will ensure you recieve your refund safely. 115,478 taxpayers did not recieve their refund checks (worth about $110 million) because the checks were returned as undeliverable.

Since 2001, the number of e-filed returns has almost doubled and over the past decade the number of e-filers has increased four-fold.

  Year 

Returns

  Total e-file 

 Percent e-file

1997

 121.5 million

19.2 million

15.8%

1998

123.8 million

24.6 million

19.9%

1999

125.9 million

29.3 million

23.3%

2000

128.4 million

35.4 million

27.6%

2001

131.0 million

40.2 million

30.7%

2002

131.7 million

46.9 million

35.6%

2003

131.6 million

52.9 million

40.2%

2004

132.2 million

61.5 million

46.5%

2005

134.0 million

68.5 million

51.1%

2006

136.1 million

73.3 million

53.8%

More than 22.6 million returns have been e-filed by taxpayers doing their own returns, up from 20.3 million from the same period last year. More than 57.4 million returns were e-filed by tax professionals, up from nearly 52.9 million last year.

Begin Preparing Your Tax Return Now

Federal Income Tax Forms

Most Popular IRS Forms & IRS Publications

These IRS forms and publications will help taxpayers file taxes and determine their tax liability in a wide range of situation.

Form 1040, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return (PDF)
Annual income tax return filed by citizens or residents of the United States
Related: Instructions for Form 1040 (PDF)  Tax Tables (PDF)

Additional forms and schedules for filing Form 1040  

Form 1040A, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return (PDF)
Shorter version of Form 1040 allows you to report limited types of income and to claim certain adjustments. You cannot itemize deductions if you file Form 1040-A
Related: Instructions for Form 1040A (PDF)

Form 1040-ES, Estimated Tax for Individuals (PDF)
Figure and pay your estimated tax on income that is not subject to withholding (for example, earnings from self-employment, interest, dividends, rents, alimony, etc.)
Related: Instructions for Form 1040-ES (PDF)

Form 1040EZ, Income Tax Return for Single and Joint Filers With No Dependents (PDF)
Simplest individual income tax return form to fill out. If you file Form 1040EZ, you cannot itemize deductions or claim any adjustments to income or tax credits (other than the earned income credit).
Related: Instructions for 1040EZ (PDF)

Need help choosing the right 1040 for your situation? Use the Interactive Tax Assistant (ITA)or read Which Form – 1040, 1040-A, or 1040-EZ?

Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate (PDF)
Complete Form W-4 so that your employer can withhold the correct federal income tax from your pay. Consider completing a new Form W-4 each year and when your personal or financial situation changes.
Related: Withholding Calculator

Form W-9, Request for Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) and Certification (PDF)
Provide your correct SSN or other TIN to the person who is required to file an information return with the IRS to report, for example, income paid to you, real estate transactions, mortgage interest you paid, acquisition or abandonment of secured property, cancellation of debt, or contributions you made to an IRA.
Related: Instructions for the Requestor of Form W-9 (PDF)

Publication 15 (Circular E), Employer’s Tax Guide (PDF)
Explains your tax responsibilities as an employer. It also includes tax tables that you need to figure the taxes to withhold from each employee.
Related: Read Pub 15 Online

Publication 17, Your Federal Income Tax (PDF)
Explains the general rules for filing a federal income tax return. It supplements the information contained in your tax form instruction booklet. It explains the tax law to make sure you pay only the tax you owe and no more.
Related: Read Pub 17 Online

Look for other current forms, instructions, and publications

The Internal Revenue Service offers content in a variety of file formats to accommodate people who use assistive technology such as screen reading software, refreshable Braille displays, and voice recognition software. We have prepared hundreds of tax forms and publications that can be downloaded or viewed online in text-only, Braille ready files, browser-friendly HTML, accessible PDF, and large print.

To download these files, use the following links:

Helpful Links

Check out the English/ASL video on the IRS YouTube Channel and meet Lex, the Tax Time canine. Lex introduces the terrific online services available for people with disabilities. Select the video link and then select the Leave IRS Site link to start the video.